Directional/Positional Concept Ideas & Resources


        • Teach these concepts first in relationship to the student's body.
        • Next teach concepts using objects related to each other..
  • Use objects that are interesting and meaningful to the student.
  • Use gestures to help make your point.
  • Talk about pictures in books.
  • Talk about a student's own actions.
  • Talk about concepts as they relate to your actions throughout the day. "I'm going to open the window.", "I'm going to put that on top of my shelf."
  • Finger plays involve lots of directional and positional words like up, down, open, close.
  • Challenge students to show you fancy dance moves. Describe what they did with directional and positional words like backward, forwards, behind, in front.
  • Sing the Hokey Pokey.
  • Direct students in their movement to music using directional and positional words.
  • Play with hula hoops. Try these instructions:
      • Walk into the hoop on the floor.
      • Walk out of the hoop.
      • Walk towards the hoop.
      • Walk away from the hoop.
      • Walk forward into the hoop.
      • Walk backward out of the hoop.
      • Walk to the center of the hoop.
  • Do barrier activities where you put a barrier between two students. The students have the same materials. One student tells the other students how to build a tower using their materials using directional and positional words. Check to see how accurately the second student was able to follow the instructions.
  • Play I Spy using directional and positional words.
  • Build a snack.
  • Play float or sink with a variety of objects in a sink full of water.
  • Sing Going on a Lion Hunt.
  • Make a directional and positional photo album. Take pictures of students on the playground demonstrating directional and positional concepts.
  • Play with peg boards.
  • Play with flannel boards.
  • Play board games like snakes and ladders.
  • Play Simon Says: “Simon says put your hand under your elbow.”, “Simon says put your hand on your head.”
  • Set up an obstacle course using table, jump rope, chair, etc. Give short directions: Crawl under the table. Walk around the rope. Sit on the chair. Crawl over the table.
  • Give each child a bean bag. Have the children put the beanbag "on top of their head", "under their chin", "beside their shoe", "on their shoulder", etc.











Activities For Helping Children Understand the Concepts of Position And Direction


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Spatial Concepts activities.

Concepts like in front of, behind, top, bottom, over, under, last, between, farthest, backward, in, on, etc., help us understand directions more precisely, ask detailed questions, and express our ideas to others.For preschoolers, an awareness or understanding of spatial concepts and relationships usually predicts later success in math, reading, and following directions.

Spatial concepts (a category of basic concepts) define the relationship between us and objects, as well as the relationships of objects to each other. As our language begins to develop, early spatial concepts such as in front of, behind, top, bottom, over, under, last, between, farthest, backward, in, on, etc., help us understand directions more precisely, ask detailed questions, and express our ideas to others. For preschoolers and young students, an awareness or understanding of spatial concepts and relationships usually predicts later success in math, reading, and following directions.
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Jessi Lalonde,
Aug 5, 2010, 12:58 PM
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Jessi Lalonde,
Aug 5, 2010, 1:29 PM
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